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Step 1 Meditation

July 2018

As a person in Long Term Recovery I have found that the spiritual principles we use in many recovery programs to be universal and are found in most if not all spiritual communities, practices, and traditions.  


Because of this I wanted to offer this comparative guide as a companion, as well as a reinforcement to anyone who is practicing spiritual traditions.


The intension is to capture the spirit of transformation as outlined in the process of step programs, in order to broaden the concepts and also so it fit in better with a lot of the spiritual and emotional practices I have picked up around, love, abundance, and intent.


Lets begin by looking at Step 1. Step one is all about recognizing where power is and where power isn't.


For many of us, we choose our methods of avoidance and abuse ourselves because we feel we are not powerful, and the things we do, we do them because they make us feel powerful.  People who gamble, drink, do drugs, have sex excessively etc, will all talk about the rush they feel and how addictive that rush is.  


This rush becomes so powerful that it overrides our sense of self to the point where often times people no longer recognize us, and often we no longer recognize ourselves and how far this power has taken us away from our path in life.  The problem is that this power is an illusion, this power is temporary, and we are only grasping for this power, because we believe there is no power within us, or it isn't enough for us to be who we want to be in the world. 


Some of us are drinking because the power the past has over our present.  Then because this power is so strong, we soon find that the power of choice is replaced by our powerlessness to the substances, making it impossible to choose to ownour life path and the power of who we are.  For some people, they need to be physically pulled out of the power of their addiction in order to have a shot at grasping for some other power, whether it be a better version of themselves they self-direct, or from higher source.  It may be possible that other people may find sufficient momentum in their practice to stay away long enough to start to lay the foundation of the intension of their new life without treatment.  Only you can be the judge, but if you have the option available to you to use outside help to get you away from substances you should by all means avail yourself of that opportunity.


Wherever you may be on the continuum of this journey, my hope and intension is that you are able to free yourself from this bondage, and find a new power, one which will not only conquer your addiction, but fill the hole which your addiction sought to fill.


Normally the next part of this would be a guided meditation but because its written in article format the questions are posed to help you consider where you are in connection to step one.

Who am I?  Am I this body only?  Am I more than this body?  When I pursue only the needs of my body, where does that leave the needs of my spirit? Do I see the limitations of the body? Do I see the limitlessness of spirit? When I am sober, can I feel a connection to the people in my life, to nature, to a better version of myself? How does abandoning ourselves to destructive physical behavior affect this connection?  


Do I understand that I am no longer that behavior, but should I decide to let my body once again take over my mind, I will once again become bound to its terms, and its release, if ever, is no longer in my hands?


Remember that you are limitless, spirit, well and healing, and no longer bound to the lower energies of the addiction plane.  You realize substances only serve to draw on your energy and does not feed it.  You will continue on your path of recovery and discover the bests parts of who you are so you can be fully present to them, alive, and allow all you can truly be to unfold.